Shakespeare Sonnet 71 Analysis, No longer mourn for me when I am dead

Shakespeare sonnet 71 theme analysis and translation

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This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 71. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets.

Shakespeare Sonnet 71 (Original Text)

No longer mourn for me when I am dead
Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell
Give warning to the world that I am fled
From this vile world with vildest worms to dwell:
Nay, if you read this line, remember not
The hand that writ it, for I love you so
That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot,
If thinking on me then should make you woe.
O if, I say, you look upon this verse
When I perhaps compounded am with clay,
Do not so much as my poor name rehearse,
But let your love even with my life decay,
Lest the wise world should look into your moan
And mock you with me after I am gone.
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Shakespeare Sonnet 71 Modern Text (Translation)

Shakespeare sonnet 71 Modern text translation

 Shakespeare Sonnet 71 Analysis

The poet implores to the fair lord not to mourn for him “No longer mourn for me” when he is dead “when I am dead longer” than youth shall hear “Than you shall hear” the hears the funeral bells “surly sullen bell” which warn the world “Give warning to the world” that the poet has escaped it “that I am fled” to live with worms “as his dead body will soon be decomposing in its grave wildest worms to dwell” But let your love even with my life decay,

He tells the youth that when he reads this poem, “The hand that writ it” do not remember the hand that had written it because the poet loves him “for I love you so” a lot and he does not want the youth to make his memory part of his sweet thoughts “That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, “as it will make him sad

He tells him to look upon the poetry when he is in his tomb or coffin, “When I perhaps compounded am with clay” the youth should not speak his name and his love for the poet should die with the poet’s death. “But let your love even with my life decay,”

The youth has to do this because the world that is wise may see the youth mourning “Lest the “wise world” should look into your moan and just as they may mock the poet after death, they will also mock the youth in the same way “And mock you with me after I am gone. “

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