Shakespeare Sonnet 107 Analysis: Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul

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This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 107. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets.

Shakespeare Sonnet 107 (Original Text)

Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul
Of the wide world dreaming on things to come,
Can yet the lease of my true love control,
Supposed as forfeit to a cónfined doom.
The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured
And the sad augurs mock their own preságe;
Incertainties now crown themselves assured,
And peace proclaims olives of endless age.
Now with the drops of this most balmy time
My love looks fresh, and death to me subscribes,
Since spite of him I’ll live in this poor rhyme,
While he insults o’er dull and speechless tribes.
And thou in this shalt find thy monument,
When tyrants’ crests and tombs of brass are spent.
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Shakespeare Sonnet 107 Modern Text (Translation)

Shakespeare sonnet 107, Modern English translation

-via SparkNotes

Shakespeare Sonnet 107 Analysis

The poet says that his own fear as well as the assumption of soothsayers “Not mine own fears, nor the prophetic soul” who dream about the future “Of the wide world dreaming on things to come,” can break him from the bond he shares with his love “Can yet the lease of my true love control, which others have regarded as a prison that the poet is confined to “Supposed as forfeit to a cónfined doom.”

Even the moon is mortal and has experienced an eclipse “The mortal moon hath her eclipse endured” and depressed fortune tellers even make fun of their own stupid predictions “And the sad augurs mock their own preságe;” and things that were doubtful are now certainties “Incertainties now crown themselves assured, “and the present time is full of peace “And peace proclaims olives of endless age.”

And now regarding these times which are blessed “Now with the drops of this most balmy time” the poet says his love looks as fresh as ever and even though he still has to die “My love looks fresh, and death to me subscribes,” the poet will continue to live on through his poetry “Since spite of him I’ll live in this poor rhyme, “which will overcome the insults of illiterate people “While he insults o’er dull and speechless tribes.”

He addressed the reader saying he will be found in his poetry which is a monument “And thou in this shalt find thy monument, “even after the reign of tyrants has ended and brass tombs have decayed “When tyrants’ crests and tombs of brass are spent.”

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