Shakespeare Sonnet 92 Analysis, But do thy worst to steal thyself away

Recommended

This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 92. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets.

Shakespeare Sonnet 92 (Original Text)

But do thy worst to steal thyself away,
For term of life thou art assurèd mine,
And life no longer than thy love will stay,
For it depends upon that love of thine.
Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs,
When in the least of them my life hath end.
I see a better state to me belongs
Than that which on thy humor doth depend.
Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind,
Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie.
O what a happy title do I find,
Happy to have thy love, happy to die!
But what’s so blessèd-fair that fears no blot?
Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.

Shakespeare Sonnet 92 Modern Text (Translation)

Shakespeare sonnet 92 modern text translation

-via SparkNotes

Shakespeare Sonnet 92 Analysis

The poet says that the youth can do his worst and go ahead and leave him, “But do thy worst to steal thyself away, “and that in his heart he has the youth for life “For term of life thou art assurèd mine,” because he will live only as long as the youth will love him “And life no longer than thy love will stay,” and thus, his life depends on the youths love “For it depends upon that love of thine.”

Because of this, the poet does not need to fear how the youth may hurt him “Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs,” because even a small hurt will make the poet die of sadness, “When in the least of them my life hath end.” he realizes he is much better off in this manner “I see a better state to me belongs” than if he was dependent on the youths good humor and affections, “Than that which on thy humor doth depend.”

The youth cannot bother the poet with his indecisiveness and fickleness “Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind,” since his life would end the moment the youth changes his mind. “Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie.”The poet considers his position a happy one “O what a happy title do I find,” because he is happy to have the youths love and also die for it Happy to have thy love, happy to die!”

But what is the best part of this condition “But what’s so blessèd-fair that fears no blot?” that the poet has nothing to worry about that if he dies and the youth betrays him, he won’t even know it “thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.”

Recommended Gifts