Shakespeare Sonnet 145 Analysis: Those lips that love’s own hand did make

Shakespeare Sonnet 145 Analysis: Those lips that love’s own hand did make

This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 145. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets.

Shakespeare Sonnet 145 (Original Text)

Those lips that love’s own hand did make
Breathed forth the sound that said “I hate”
To me that languished for her sake;
But when she saw my woeful state,
Straight in her heart did mercy come,
Chiding that tongue that, ever sweet,
Was used in giving gentle doom,
And taught it thus anew to greet:
“I hate” she altered with an end
That followed it as gentle day
Doth follow night, who like a fiend
From heav’n to hell is flown away.
“I hate” from hate away she threw,
And saved my life, saying “not you.”

WIKI

Shakespeare Sonnet 145 Modern Text (Translation)

Shakespeare-sonnet-145 modern text translation
Via – Sparknotes

Shakespeare Sonnet 145 Analysis

The poet addresses his mistress saying that her lips that look like were made by the goddess of love “Those lips that love’s own hand did make” has said the words “I hate” “Breathed forth the sound that said “I hate” that was spoken to me who pined for her “To me that languished for her sake;” but after she saw the poet’s pitiful condition “But when she saw my woeful state,”

She immediately felt pity in her heart “Straight in her heart did mercy come,”and she scolded her own tongue that was sweet before “Chiding that tongue that, ever sweet,” but was used in speaking something else to him “Was used in giving gentle doom,” and has taught it to speak something new to the poet “And taught it thus anew to greet: “ where she has changed the words “I hate” and added something new ““I hate” she altered with an end”

just like how the gentle and pleasant day “That followed it as gentle day” follows the night who he says I s like a wicked person (fiend) “Doth follow night, who like a fiend” that runs away from heaven into hell “From heav’n to hell is flown away.

Thus she has removed the essence of hatred from the words “I hate” “ “I hate” from hate away she threw,” and in doing so has saved his life from the pitiful condition by adding “not you” and implying it wasn’t him she was talking to “And saved my life, saying “not you.”

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