Shakespeare Sonnet 113 Analysis: Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind

Shakespeare sonnet 113 summary, analysis, theme and modern english translation

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This is a short summary of Shakespeare sonnet 113. Continue reading for complete analysis and meaning in the modern text. For the complete list of 154 sonnets, check the collection of Shakespeare Sonnets with analysis. It is highly recommended to buy “The Monument” by Hank Whittemore, which is the best book on Shakespeare Sonnets.

Shakespeare Sonnet 113 (Original Text)

Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind,
And that which governs me to go about
Doth part his function, and is partly blind,
Seems seeing, but effectually is out;
For it no form delivers to the heart
Of bird, of flow’r, or shape which it doth latch.
Of his quick objects hath the mind no part,
Nor his own vision holds what it doth catch;
For if it see the rud’st or gentlest sight,
The most sweet favor or deformèd’st creature,
The mountain, or the sea, the day, or night,
The crow, or dove, it shapes them to your feature.
Incapable of more, replete with you,
My most true mind thus makes mine untrue.

Shakespeare Sonnet 113 Modern Text (Translation)

Shakespeare sonnet 113 Modern English Translation

-via SparkNotes

Shakespeare Sonnet 113 Analysis

The poet says since he left the fair lord, he is always immersed in thought “Since I left you, mine eye is in my mind, and his faculties of vision that enables him to move “And that which governs me to go about” makes him see sometimes and sometimes makes him blind “Doth part his function, and is partly blind, and seeing (his vision) is not effective “Seems seeing, but effectually is out;

He says his vision does not allow him to see “For it no form delivers to the heart” or register the shapes of birds and flowers “Of bird, of flow’r, or shape which it doth latch.” His mind does not register objects seen by the eye “Of his quick objects hath the mind no part,” and neither does his eyes continue to focus on what he sees “Nor his own vision holds what it doth catch;”

Regardless whether his eye sees the most beautiful or ugly creatures “For if it see the rud’st or gentlest sight,” or the sweetest of looking beings or ugly creatures “The most sweet favor or deformèd’st creature,” even if it is he mountain or seas, day or night “The mountain, or the sea, the day, or night,” or whether t is the crow or the dove, everything he sees seems to resemble the fair lord “The crow, or dove, it shapes them to your feature.”

The poet says he is incapable of seeing anything in his mind as it is filled with the thought of the fair lord “Incapable of more, replete with you,” and his loyalty to the fair lord makes him see everything differently “My most true mind thus makes mine untrue.”

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